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required courses

Field Education Courses:


HWC 500 Field Education I
Placement in practice settings under supervision of a licensed M.S.W. Students will be graded S/F. Must be taken concurrently with HWC 513.
4-6 credits, fall semester

HWC 501 Field Education II
A continuation of HWC 500. Students will be graded S/F. Must be taken concurrently with HWC 514.
Prerequisites: HWC 500 and 513
4-6 credits, spring semester

HWC 502 Field Education III
Placement in advanced social work practice settings based on area of Specialization. Supervision provided by a licensed MSW. Students will be graded S/F. Must be taken concurrently with Required Specialization Practice Course- (CPPSA: HWC 570; FYT: HWC 531; IH: HWC 564).
Prerequisites: HWC 500, 501, 513 and 514
4-6 credits, fall semester

HWC 503 Field Instruction IV
A continuation of HWC 502. Students will be graded S/F. Must be taken concurrently with Required Specialization Practice Course (CPPSA: HWC 571; FYT: HWC 532; IH: HWC 565)
Prerequisites: HWC 502 and the Required Specialization Practice Course (CPPSA: HWC 570; FYT: HWC 531; IH: HWC 564)
4-6 credits, spring semester


Generalist Foundation Courses:

HWC 504: Human Behavior in the Social Environment (HBSE): Critical Applications of Social Work Theory
This course applies a multi-theoretical and critical approach to social inquiry in the examination of complex theories, meta-perspectives, and knowledge about individuals, families, groups, organizations, institutions and urban, suburban, and rural communities. The course encourages students to maintain a view of people and their environments as heterogeneous and socio-historically embedded, as well as adaptable and resilient. Throughout the course, special consideration is given to social and cultural diversity. Students will develop a multi-dimensional (e.g., social, psychological and cultural) understanding of human behavior as applied to contemporary issues in social work practice.
3 credits, fall semester

HWC 505: Integrating Seminar
This course extends the work covered in the first semester foundation courses and provides students opportunities to apply human behavior theory to social work practice situations. Students will integrate knowledge and skills acquired in social work practice, social justice, HBSE, policy, field education and research courses to social and clinical issues across diverse topics. Class activities include experiential assignments and project based learning. This course prepares students to practice in interdisciplinary environments.
3 credits spring semester

HWC 509: Foundations of Social Justice: Challenging Oppression
This course explores the meaning of social justice within the context of political economy, human nature, and health policy. Examination will include the relation of historical implications within contemporary discourse. This course will analyze the foundations of power, privilege, and prejudice in the United States through the lens of social work ethos that values human rights, equality, respect, and health for all. Emphasis will be placed on the identification of social injustice, challenging institutional oppression, and the creation of effective methods to empower marginalized and oppressed populations.
3 credits, fall semester

HWC 510: Social Policy & Social Determinants
This course builds upon the Foundations of Social Justice: Challenging Oppression course through the discussion and exploration of social policies, social determinants of health, and contemporary & historical social movements that have arisen to challenge oppression. This course utilizes frameworks for social policy analysis while addressing continuing dilemmas in policy development. Experiential learning and beyond-the-classroom experiences introduce students to the processes and dynamics of social movements, social change, and their effects on social policy.
3 credits, spring semester

HWC 511: Research I
This course is the first part of a two-semester course sequence designed to prepare social work students to engage in research informed social work practice and practice informed social work research and evaluation. The first semester (HWC511) provides an overview of the research process from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives and examines how a critical approach to research may form the basis of evidence-based social work practice and client empowerment. The course goes on to examine those elements of the research process that are common to all methodologies: the ethical conduct of research; literature searches and reviews; development of research questions and hypotheses; measurement; and sampling procedures.  Quantitative data analysis is introduced in the form of univariate/descriptive statistics.
3 credits, fall semester

HWC 512: Research II
This course is the second part of a two-semester course sequence designed to prepare social work students to engage in research informed social work practice and practice informed social work research and evaluation.  The second semester (HWC512) follows-up on the first by examining specific data collection methods (experiments; surveys; interviews; focus groups; ethnographies; etc.), with attention given to understanding how these methods are used appropriately in social work research and evaluation processes.  Quantitative data analysis procedures at the bivariate and multivariate levels (t-tests; ANOVA; correlation; regression; chi-square test, etc.), hypothesis testing, inferential statistics, and computer assisted data analysis using SPSS will be presented in the context of appropriate data collection methods. Emphasis placed on research proposal development and critical evaluation of research reports.
3 credits, spring semester

HWC 513: Social Work Practice I
Provides a foundation for generalist practice, including the knowledge base, values and skill development necessary for ethical and effective practice with individuals, families, groups and communities.  Students are introduced to the helping process across client systems and across the life-span through a strengths perspective and empowerment approach to practice.  Evidence-based short-term therapies are used to guide direct practice to address resilience and human development. Must be taken concurrently with HWC 500.
3 credits, fall semester

HWC 514: Social Work Practice II
A continuation of HWC 513.  Revisits the helping process in greater depth with specific reference to special consideration for work with families, groups, communities and organizations. The broad range of social work roles across client systems is considered. Deepens knowl­edge of generalist practice, ethical practice and skill development. Must be taken concurrently with HWC 501.
3 credits, spring semester

HWC 596: Community Learning and Professional Preparation I: First Year
This 1-credit required course will provide foundational knowledge, values and skills to prepare the student as a social work professional.  Topics covered in this course include professional pathways, areas of practice, advocacy and communication skills, and other topics specific to the students’ social work education.  Attendance is required at two full-day events at the Stony Brook campus per academic year.  Dates will be posted at the beginning of the Fall term. Co-requisites: HWC 509 and HWC 510

HWC 597: Community Learning and Professional Preparation II: Second Year 
This 1-credit required course will provide advanced knowledge, values and skills to prepare the student as a Social Worker for entry into the profession.  Topics covered in this course include professional pathways, licensure, advanced advocacy and professional communication skills, and other topics specific to the students’ social work specialization.  Attendance is required at two full-day events at the Stony Brook campus per academic year.  Dates will be posted at the beginning of the Fall term.

 

 


 

2nd Year Specialization Courses:

HWC 519  Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology (Requirement for all 2nd year students)
This course focuses on the concepts of mental health, mental disorders and the influence of culture on both.  The mental health concerns of diverse social, racial and ethnic groups, particularly those historically devalued and oppressed are covered.  In addition, the use and misuse of the classification system of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM V) are examined.  This examination includes the distinction between major mental disorders and other forms of dysfunctional behavior and the recognition of symptoms.  Assessment of psychosocial functioning within a multi-cultural and gender role frame is emphasized.  Social work values, roles, responsibilities and ethical considerations are detailed throughout the course.  The role of the social worker as an integral member of the interdisciplinary mental health team is discussed. Prerequisites:  HWC 500, 501, 504, 513 and 514. 
3 credits, fall semester

Stony Brook University School of Social Welfare requires students to select a specialization in their second year. Click here for information about the Specializations.

 



Electives:

Students are required to complete 9 credit hours of advanced elective courses. Advanced practice electives are only open to students who have successfully completed their foundation courses. Advanced Practice Electives are part of the advanced generalist curriculum and address topics that consider specific populations, complex problem situations or particular social work roles and functions relevant to advanced generalist practice. Electives are offered during different days, evenings and week-ends in order to respond to the varying needs of the student body.

The following is a list of electives, a subset of which is offered each academic year:

 Advanced Practice Electives:

HWC 507  Master’s Project
Students complete a master’s project under the sponsorship of a faculty member.
3 credits, semester varies  

HWC 508  Continuation of Master’s Project
A continuation of HWC 507 for students who did not finish their Master’s Project during the term in which they had reg­istered for it. Students will be graded S/F.
Prerequisite: HWC 507
0 credit, semester varies

HWC 520  Advanced Social Work Practice with the Aged
This course examines concepts and strategies for working with the eld­erly at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels of interven­tion. It presents and critically analyzes a variety of approaches in working with the elderly and their families.  Interventions with the well elderly living in the community, the elderly who suffer some disabilities but who are still living in the community and the elderly who are institutionalized are examined.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 522  Human Sexuality
This course identifies personal attitudes and judgments about sexually related behaviors. Critically examines factual information derived from research in human sexuality and covers a wide range of sexual behavior from a knowledge base.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 527 - Social Work in the Political Process – Campaign School
Limited to 20 second-year students. Instructor consent is required. The purpose of the course is to advance students' understanding of the political process and to expand students’ repertoire of skills for participation in the political process. A prime focus is deepening students' commitment to engaging in the political process as a significant form of social work practice for social change. This is a hybrid course combining online content, in-class participation as well as required attendance at a 2-day Campaign School workshop at the University of Connecticut School of Social Work in West Hartford.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 533  Family Intervention in Health and Mental Health
This course focuses on family and marital problems. Envi­ronmental, social, economic, psychological and institutional pressures that affect family functioning are examined. Emphasis is placed on inter­vention skills.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 538 Death and Dying; Loss and Separation
This course explores student values, attitudes, fears and conceptions relating to death and dying. Issues of loss and sepa­ration in relation to various age groups, cultural orientations and societal expectations are examined. The focus is on the acquisition of bereavement counseling skills.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 542  Social Work with Children: The Social Worker’s Role
This course is designed to provide an understanding of the special issues and concerns surrounding work with children. Professional dilemmas and guidelines to aid practice are identified. Special issues involved in work with young children are highlighted. Although the focus is on direct work with children, a family-centered approach is presented. Practitioner roles, the impact of service settings, policy and legislation affecting this area of practice are reviewed as is the knowledge base that serves to guide practice, including formulations of practice theory and empirical research findings.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 545  Individual, Group and Family Treatment of Alcoholics  and Substance Abusers
This course covers alcoholism and substance abuse as family illnesses and their stages of development, as well as the impact these ill­nesses have on the families of active and recovering alcoholics and substance abusers. Ethical dilemmas and treatment modalities including self-help groups and on traditional and relatively recent modalities used in the treat­ment of addicted individuals and their families are focused on.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 546  Working with Adult Children of Alcoholics and  Substance Abusers
This course focuses on adult children of alcoholic parents and how par­ents’ illness affects their children’s social, emotional, and educational development from infancy to adulthood and into old age.  Survival roles of children in alcoholic families and how these affect adult functioning are discussed.  Examines ethical issues and the continuing effect family alcoholism has on adult children and the intervention strategies used in treatment.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 547  Managing Conflict
A major concern for health and human service managers is conflict in organization, community and group settings.  The various types of conflicts and the concepts of negotiation and mediation as interventive strategies are considered.  Didactic and experiential learning experiences are utilized.  Focus is on analyzing conflict situations and selecting interventive strategies to reduce, contain or heighten the conflict situation.  Oppressive conditions, structures and processes are considered major determinants of human suffering and individual and social problems; students examine how these oppressive conditions are present in conflict situations and consider ways of dealing with them.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 548  Adolescent Development and Health Promotion
The effect on adolescent development of physiological changes, relationships with peers and family, and societal expectations are examined.  Emphasis is on the development of assessment and engagement skills for working with adolescents and their families to help counteract adolescent self-destructive behavior and promote well-being.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 550  Culture-Centered Approach to Social Work Practice
This course provides students with an opportunity for self growth while preparing to work with individuals and their families from a culture- centered value base. Culture-centered foundation practice provides students with a frame of reference for better understanding and appreciation of the difference of their own culture from the cultures of others.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 555  Supervision in Health and Human Service Organizations
This course prepares social workers for the variety of tasks related to supervisory practice in health care agencies. Supervision is introduced as a teaching process, as an administrative func­tion and as a program development tool. Emphasis is on help­ing workers function effectively with culturally diverse clients, populations at risk and the chronically ill. Content includes: historical perspective of supervisory practice; supervisor and agency structure; the organizational context of practice; learning theories; concepts of power, authority and accountability; ethical and clinical issues; supervisory tech­niques, skill and self awareness; staff and program develop­ment and evaluation.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 556  Proposal Writing in the Health and Human Service Fields
This course provides a comprehensive study of the principles and methods used to prepare program, training, research, demonstration and other types of proposals. Extensive workshop practice in developing appropriate writing skills and in locat­ing and accessing funding sources is included.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 558  Human Services Administration
An introduction to the practice of administration of public and non-profit agencies, theories of management including alter­native decision-making models, understanding of organiza­tional structure and process, external and internal functions including interagency collaboration and personnel and finan­cial management, affirmative action and ethical issues. The course combines theory with case examples, practical exercises and other experiential learning modes.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 559  Mental Health Evidence-Based Practice
This course develops the knowledge and skills necessary for working with individuals with a diagnosis of serious mental illness using recovery-oriented evidence-based practices. This course is designed for M.S.W. students and M.S.W. mental health practitioners. The course familiarizes students with evidence-based practices, within a recovery-oriented paradigm, as a general approach to practice as well as specific evidence-based interventions to use for indi­viduals with a diagnosis of serious mental illness. Students should have a basic knowledge of serious mental illness as pre- or co-requisite, however a review will be provided. Research literature is examined to determine the various levels of support for specific interventions and essential principles for translating research into practice. Appropriate treatment outcomes that reflect effective quality mental health practice are identified. Focus is on providing assessment and treat­ment to a diverse group of individuals with a diagnosis of seri­ous mental illness.
3 credits, spring semester

HWC 568  The Workings of the Brain: Practice Issues for Social Workers
Addresses the organization, development and functions of the brain and how this influences how we think, feel and behave. Causes of organic changes in the brain such as substance abuse, disease and injury are addressed. Advances in neuro­science that have aided in diagnosis and social work practice are covered. Innovative treatment modalities such as EMDR, biofeedback and vagal nerve implants are presented. Strongly emphasizes the combination of science and practice issues.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 569  Childhood Sexual Abuse and Long-Term Sequelae: Assessment and Intervention
This course focuses on the assessment and clinical intervention with adults who were sexually abused in childhood.  Treatment for eating disorders, substance abuse, self-injurious behavior, sexual dysfunction, PTSD and dissociative identity disorder (DID) are addressed as well as other health related issues emanating from the trauma of childhood sexual abuse.  Cultural, legal, political, and ethical dilemmas are also examined.
3  credits, semester varies

HWC 577  Program Evaluation
This course provides an in-depth analysis of the technical requirements of program evaluation and the organizational and political con­straints that influence the evaluation process. Tech­niques in the design and implementation of evaluation research in the health and human services fields are covered.
Prerequisites: HWC 511 and 512
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 578  Advanced Social Work with Groups
This course explores the principles and practice of group work in assist­ing clients to maximize psychosocial functioning. Class mem­bers will participate in an experience that encourages them to realize the power of group work process and usefulness of this modality. Group work techniques, context, dynamics, skills and the role of the group facilitator are discussed. In presenting group work with special populations students learn about the impact of issues including development, discrimination, ill­ness, addiction and separation on the commonality of the human experience as it presents in group practice.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work
These courses examine significant timely issues confronting the profession. Topics include violence as a public health problem, issues of aging, racism, gender, AIDS, the media, and others. Topics vary each term as faculty develop specific modules that address one or more of these issues. 
1-3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work: Working in Health Care Systems
The School of Social Welfare recognizes the centrality of health as an issue in all people’s lives.  It is with this in mind that the School has embraced the concept of health as an organizing principle and theme throughout its curriculum.  Issues of health are of concern regardless of practice setting or intervention modality utilized. This course will provoke discussions combining practical implications of social work in the field of healthcare, the CSWE core competencies and the NASW Code of Ethics. Consistent with the mission of our School, we will study the impact of race and culture on the health status of people in our country as well as the major public health problems of today.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work: Social Work in Substance Abuse
This course covers alcoholism and substance abuse as it relates to various fields of practice in social work.  Social, economic and political implications are considered in a micro, mezzo and macro context.  Emphasis is placed on evaluating the efficacy of historical and contemporary treatment interventions. Ethical and legal ramifications of the use of licit and illicit substances in our culture are examined.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work: The Dynamics of Trauma
This course will examine the complexity and range of traumatic events. For example, the way temperament, genetic pre-disposition and environment impact traumatic reactions; as well as the physiological and psychological reactions that individuals experience.  Throughout this course we will examine therapeutic interventions with different populations (children, adults, groups, elders) as they recover from trauma experiences. This course will cover the range of psychological models that comprise trauma theory and examine the protective factors that mediate post-traumatic growth. Throughout this course we will examine cultural, legal, judicial and policy issues that impact trauma treatments.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work: Therapeutic Interventions for Trauma
This course will examine therapeutic interventions with different populations (children, adults, groups, elders) as they recover from trauma experiences.  This course will appraise the range of psychological models that comprise trauma theory and examine the promotive factors that mediate Post-traumatic Growth. Throughout this course we will examine cultural, legal, judicial and policy issues that impact trauma treatment.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work: Social and Political Change
By its nature, social and political change is action oriented. This course will provide students with the opportunity and value, knowledge and skill based guidance to undertake an actual advocacy/community change oriented capstone project.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work: Social Work in Higher Education
This course introduces the Student-Community Development Model as an integrated application of social work, community organization and social work practice modalities.  It introduces historical developments in higher education, student development theory and how political, socio-economic, cultural and health issues impact higher education.  Utilizing alternative conflict management and mediation models, this course explores organizational structures and appropriate intervention strategies for advancing positive systems change.  A variety of contemporary social issues on college campuses are examined to inform and support social workers as change agents within the arena of campus life.  Leadership development and social work practice roles in this setting are emphasized.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work: Aging in Place (online)
This course will cover the key domains that enable older adults to age in place -- the ability to stay in one’s home and community safely, independently and comfortably, regardless of age and income. Participants will acquire the skills and knowledge needed to navigate systems and support older adults, their families and caregivers through transitions and choices. Utilizing an integrated care coordination approach, this course will include behavioral/health issues, family, social and community engagement, along with policy and practice considerations. 
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work: LGBTQ in Social Work Practice
The purpose of this course is to enhance students’ professional competence with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) people. Content explores social work practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and across social, political, and economic realms.  Students will be introduced to LGBTQ civil rights movement and the underlying theories of sexual orientation and sexual identity development.  As sexual orientation in contemporary culture is politically charged and socially regulated, students will be taught macro-level advocacy skills to fulfill their call as social workers by promoting social justice and equality. On the micro level, students will learn appropriate clinical assessment tools and social work intervention skills for use with LGBTQ people.  A life cycle perspective will be presented to highlight the unique issues of LGBTQ people at various stages of human development, from the very young to the very old. Special concerns within the population, such as the coming out process, adolescent suicide, aging, and coping methods, will be considered.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work:  Forensic Social Work: Psychosocial and Legal Issues
This advanced elective prepares social workers to integrate socio-legal knowledge when working with diverse population in forensic practice with individual, families, and communities impacted by the criminal justice system. Students will increase their competencies to practice at the intersection of social work, public health, and the law using human rights and social justice frameworks. The course will explore evidence-based engagement strategies, assessment, and interventions encountered in various settings including health care, child welfare, addiction treatment facilities, and juvenile and criminal justice.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work: Social Work Practice with the Military
This 3-credit practice elective focuses on the specific challenges of those who serve in the military and the response of social work practitioners to those challenges.  The course will explore the nature of war, its impact on those who are wounded - physically and mentally -- and the impact of the military experience on them and their loved ones/caregivers. Students will be introduced to a theoretical orientation to combat stress management that acknowledges the stressors of war and the adaptations made by those engaged in war-related activity.   Course content will explore the culture of the military and how that impacts the service member; will explore the stages of deployment and how both the service member and those close to him/her manage the departure and return to civilian life. In addition, students will be provided with an overview of the management of various war related physical and mental health challenges.  Particular emphasis will detail the impact of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan on returning veterans, many suffering with PTSD, Traumatic Brain Injury and substance abuse problems. Additional areas of exploration include the challenges faced by women in the military, the wounded, those who contemplate suicide. The on-going need for care for the practitioners who attend to the needs of our military will be explored with suggestions for self-care. Intervention strategies and case material will enhance student understanding. 
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Work: Disabilities in Social Work Practice
This course will provide a framework for practice with individuals with disabilities based on cognitive-behavioral and solution-focused therapies. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the acute issues facing individuals with disabilities primarily from a social model lens which focuses on socio-environmental constraints and barriers. These include limited human rights, access to care and treatment choices, and socio-cultural forces. Psychosocial factors will also be explored. The empirical knowledge base that informs and guides the assessment and  heory based interventions of individuals with disabilities will be examined and critiqued. 
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 581  Public Health and Community Health Intervention
This course examines many of the critical public health issues of today. Students gain an understanding of the concepts underlying social epidemiology and develop an appreciation of the ways in which the health status of different populations in this country is differentially impacted. Community health plan­ning strategies (e.g. health promotion and health education) are examined.
 3 credits, semester varies

HWC 582  Organizational Dynamics and Legal and Ethical Issues in Healthcare
This course examines some of the traditional, as well as newer, models through which healthcare services are delivered. Particular emphasis is given to the issue of access to health services as well as the location of the professional social worker within these systems. Students gain the ability to conceptualize many of the critical ethical and legal issues impacting the field today.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 584  Community Analysis and Health Promotion
Explores diverse concepts of community, analyzes a range of community structures, processes and power relationships. Investigates contemporary models, strategies and tactics of community organizing and health promotion in the United States and in selected other countries and emphasizes efforts made by poor people, ethnic minorities of color and women to organize and mobilize community groups and movements. Highlights group and community analysis and organization skills.
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 588  Qualitative Health Research Methods
The class works as a team on a joint project. Topics include problem formulation, instrument construction, sampling strategy, interviewing, data transcription and data analysis.
Prerequisites: HWC 511 and 512
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 589 Biostatistics
This course is an introduction to the analysis and interpretation of quantita­tive data using bio-statistical methods. It examines three inter­related issues: the nature of quantitative data and their relationship to social, psychological and biological concepts, the different ways data can be presented to help others under­stand research questions and the answers to those questions, and the basic and intermediate bio-statistical techniques avail­able for analyzing data. Focuses on how data relate to research questions that are of interest to workers in the health care field.
Prerequisites: HWC 512 or equivalent
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 592  Community Building in Higher Education
This course introduces the Student-Community Development Model as an integrated application of social work, community organization and social work practice modalities.  The class works together on a joint project that aims to create community on campus.   
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 593  Student-Community Development Seminar I
This course introduces the Student-Community Development Model as an integrated application of social work, community organization and social work practice modalities.  It introduces historical developments in higher education, student development theory and how political, socio-economic, cultural and health issues impact higher education. How these systems influence and shape student and community wellness on the college campus is emphasized.  Contemporary higher education organizational structures, planning modalities and intervention strategies are examined to support social work practice in this setting. 
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 594  Student-Community Development Seminar II
This course builds upon the content covered in HWC 593 and continues an examination of how societal systems influence and shape higher education. By utilizing alternative conflict management and mediation models, this course explores organizational structures and appropriate intervention strategies for advancing positive systems change. A variety of contemporary social issues on college campuses are examined to inform and support social workers as change agents within the arena of campus life. Leadership development and social work practice roles in this setting are emphasized. Pre-requisite HWC 593. 
3 credits, semester varies

HWC 595  Independent Study
Independent study with an individual faculty member. Designation as enrichment or advanced practice elective is determined with faculty sponsor.
1-3 credits, semester varies

HWC 599  Maintenance of Matriculation
For students who are maintaining matriculation while engag­ing in consultation with faculty regarding completion of courses and/or the Master’s Project. Students will be graded S/F.
1 credit, semester varies

HWL 500  Study at Touro
For students in the M.S.W./J.D. program and who are main­taining matriculation while enrolled at Touro Law Center.
0 credits, fall and spring terms